The Industrial Revolution programmed the world to consume. Before the revolution it was common to only own one pair of jeans. Today it is common to have a dozen pairs. The Industrial Revolution programmed people to buy more things, thereby driving sales, which fueled factories. Factories demanded men and women sit on assembly lines and mindlessly endure the demeaning process. The prospect of creativity or producing something of their own was nowhere to be found.

This consumer-drone mentality bled into many areas of life and has continued into the Information Age. We read, like, and consume anything that streams through our personal conveyer belt. Instead of critically producing information we passively consume hours of content-less media.

We read, like, and consume anything that streams through our personal conveyer belt. Instead of critically producing information we passively consume hours of content-less media.

This mindless thinking has spread even to the fabric of western Christianity. We attend church, group, worship, prayer, etc to eat, receive, consume. The more we consume the less satisfied we are. The less satisfied we are the more we crave. The more we crave the more we consume. As we consume, we need more and more, while feeling less and less capable to give to those around us—deflating our pride and self-esteem, driving us to the table for another encouraging word, or meme.

We were not designed to be consumers. We are designed to be creators. We are designed to invent, create, mold, shape, and give to the world around us. Jesus himself said, “’It is more blessed to give than to receive.’” (Act 20:35 ESV). We are called to give, serve, and go—not take, sit, and stay.

Therefore—begin giving. Start creating. Write encouraging notes. Give away finances. Pray for people. Buy someone in need a meal. Serve. Produce—craft gifts, write, take photos, bake, plant, sing. Break the cycle of the Industrial Christianity by becoming a giver, a producer—and you will find yourself, and your relationships, richer because of it.

Aden E. Wright lives Middle East. Aden is laboring among the Muslim people groups to establish houses of prayer across the Middle East so that the Arab world might seek and find God (Amos 9:11). Aden writes at AdenEzra.com